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Author Topic: A possible (re)solution for the Intel IGP/GMA problems!  (Read 278946 times)
Ziglio

Posts: 13


« Reply #15 on: November 20, 2006, 07:43:15 PM »

Hi all,

just to revive this thread: a while ago Intel released version 5.1 of the embedded graphic drivers. Most of my problems with stability have gone!
For example with version 5 my PC would freeze just after opening programs like Google Earth. That wouldn't occur after a fresh restart.
I'm totaly impressed with this version.
Still I haven't managed to go on native resolution with my crappy Bravia S26A10. Also I can't match the VGA output levels, so the colors on the TV look washed out.
Any clues? thanks!

P.S. I solved my overlay problem by setting Overlay off and Hi Quality mode on in in Windows Media player options, video acceleration, advanced.
I don't know if that has anything to do with the new overlay option of the Intel drivers
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RotJ

Posts: 1


« Reply #16 on: December 04, 2006, 05:28:07 PM »

Thanks for the tip.  The embedded drivers are letting my Toshiba Satellite A15 output widescreen resolutions now.  The hardware acceleration gets a bit wonky in WMP, though.

What's Intel's rationale for limiting the resolutions like this?
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aphilgr1

Posts: 9


« Reply #17 on: December 06, 2006, 04:12:21 AM »

Is it possible to have 50Hz out with this workaround on th VGA and DVI ports?
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majosan

Posts: 1


« Reply #18 on: January 06, 2007, 02:06:38 PM »

I have been trying to figure all this out as well.
I have contacted Intel, Toshiba (laptop), and LG (monitor), and still have found no solution.
Sure, the embedded drivers work if you want to output widescreen resolutions and such, but you cannot play games with those drivers (has no direct3d, for example).
I need to find a solution that allows me to use the current drivers (newest), and output at a widescreen resolution.
I have tried everything, so I am posting the diagnostics report.
As you can see, the laptop reads the monitor perfectly, even the supported resolutions. However, even though the EDID information comes through fine, I cannot use the resolution I want (any widescreen).
Maybe you guys can help. We know the embedded drivers work, we know the card is capable of the output, and we know the monitor information is correct. Now, how can I make the output work (for example 1360x768) with the newest drivers?

Thanks for your help.
Best Regards.




INTEL(R) EXTREME GRAPHICS 2 FOR MOBILE REPORT


Report Date:      12/29/2006
Report Time[hr:mm:ss]:   01:47:38
Driver Version:      6.14.10.4497
Operating System:      Windows XP* Home Edition, Service Pack 2 (5.1.2600)
Default Language:      English
DirectX* Version:      9.0
Physical Memory:      750 MB
Minimum Graphics Memory:   16 MB
Maximum Graphics Memory:   64 MB
Graphics Memory in Use:   7 MB
Processor:      x86
Processor Speed:      2793 MHZ
Vendor ID:      8086
Device ID:      3582
Device Revision:      02


*   Accelerator Information   *

Accelerator in Use:      Intel(R) 82852/82855 GM/GME Graphics Controller
Video BIOS:      2894
Current Graphics Mode:   1024 by 768 True Color (60 Hz)



*   Devices Connected to the Graphics Accelerator   *


Active Monitors: 1
Active Notebook Displays: 1


*   Monitor   *

Monitor Name:      Plug and Play Monitor
Display Type:      Analog
Gamma Value:      2.0
DDC2 Protocol:      Supported
Maximum Image Size:   Horizontal: 27.0 inches
         Vertical:   15.0 inches
Monitor Supported Modes:
640 by 480 (60 Hz)
640 by 480 (60 Hz)
640 by 480 (75 Hz)
720 by 400 (70 Hz)
800 by 600 (60 Hz)
800 by 600 (60 Hz)
800 by 600 (75 Hz)
832 by 624 (75 Hz)
1024 by 768 (60 Hz)
1024 by 768 (60 Hz)
1024 by 768 (70 Hz)
1024 by 768 (75 Hz)
1152 by 870 (75 Hz)
1280 by 768 (60 Hz)
1360 by 768 (60 Hz)
Display Power Management Support:
   Standby Mode:   Supported
   Suspend Mode:   Supported
   Active Off Mode: Supported


*   Notebook   *

Monitor Name:      Toshiba Internal 1024x768 Panel
Display Type:      Digital
Gamma Value:      3.0
DDC2 Protocol:      Supported
Maximum Image Size:   Horizontal: Not Available
         Vertical:   Not Available
Monitor Supported Modes:
640 by 480 (60 Hz)
800 by 600 (60 Hz)
1024 by 768 (60 Hz)
Display Power Management Support:
   Standby Mode:   Supported
   Suspend Mode:   Supported
   Active Off Mode: Supported

* Other names and brands are the property of their respective owners.
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Ziglio

Posts: 13


« Reply #19 on: April 02, 2007, 04:53:33 AM »

Hello everyone, we haven't talked yet about Intel Embedded Graphics Driver, version 6.1.


They promise some improvements, like D3D rendering. But I've found them hard to configure. There are definitely more options.
First they were unstable with my laptop (which has the 855 chipset) and I've discovered I had to turn off the display detection.
I think that is related to me having a legacy vbios, which doesn't support display detection.
The internal LVDS I think can't be detected, by default, so it would work.
But for external CRT that could be a problem.

Also I've found more info about what 'studio levels' means (why the black from VGA is set to output level 16 instead of zero).
That can be happily adjusted with contrast and brightness calibration. On the american AV forum there's plenty of information on how to do that.

Still haven't managed to introduce my own DTD, which would be the only way for us to output different timings.

Well, I'm happy to keep sharing information regarding these drivers with anyone who might be interested. Still hope one day Intel would provide the necessary information for Powerstrip to support Intel chipsets!
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archibael

Posts: 32


« Reply #20 on: April 02, 2007, 04:47:45 PM »

Found a possible solution to this problem, though I don't know if Rik can use this to implement in PowerStrip or not...

http://softwarecommunity.intel.com/isn/Community/en-US/forums/thread/30225452.aspx

It's a .INF file hack prior to graphics driver install, but it looks like it just opens up a set of registry keys to edit with DTD values.  Could it be modifiable in the registry realtime?

Hope this helps.
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Ziglio

Posts: 13


« Reply #21 on: April 02, 2007, 11:16:54 PM »

DTD values can be added with the installation generator that is contained in the drivers 6.1.

The key to use them I believe is in the EDID parameter.
If you set it to 0 then the TV's EDID is ignored.
Then you can use the parameter edid_nonavail to tell the drivers either to get the EDID values from the driver itself (or from the vbios? I don't understand very well) or from user generated timings.

PowerStrip can't change the resolution in a dtd (number of pixels per row and per colums) but it seems like it lets you change the other parameters.

So, my idea is:
- use the laptop as primary monitor and the tv as secondary.
- create a number of DTDs in the installation file (or in the registry directly)
- activate the multiple monitor (extended mode) in power strip
- select a resolution for the secondary monitor
- play around with the timing and see if it works
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Naota

Posts: 4


« Reply #22 on: April 04, 2007, 01:43:31 AM »

Hello everyone.

I don't know if this will help, but I've found a solution used by linux users. It's called the 915resolution and can be found here: http://www.geocities.com/stomljen/.
With this they can modify their vbios and replace one hardwired resolution with a custom one. It has some limitations, but if someone could write something like this for windows, our job would be quite easy using custom resolutions. And there would be no need for the embedded drivers. Sorry if this is useless or known information.
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archibael

Posts: 32


« Reply #23 on: April 04, 2007, 12:12:19 PM »

Quote from: "Naota"
Hello everyone.

I don't know if this will help, but I've found a solution used by linux users. It's called the 915resolution and can be found here: http://www.geocities.com/stomljen/.
With this they can modify their vbios and replace one hardwired resolution with a custom one. It has some limitations, but if someone could write something like this for windows, our job would be quite easy using custom resolutions. And there would be no need for the embedded drivers. Sorry if this is useless or known information.


Yes, Linux accesses the Vbios in a different way, from what I understand: makes a copy of it in memory and then uses that copy to drive the graphics.  In Windows, the Vbios is accessed directly by the drivers, so without a rewrite of the drivers themselves we're kind of SOL on that one.

The workaround I posted was for the standard drivers, not the embedded, but it still involves a manual registry hack.  I would assume someone could automate the registry hack process with Perl or even VisualBasic in order to provide a "pseudo-PowerStrip", but I don't have a system to experiment with right now.
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Naota

Posts: 4


« Reply #24 on: April 04, 2007, 01:40:53 PM »

Quote from: "archibael"
...


I see. Could you recommend me a fine EDID reader, from which I could find the needed values easily? I mean I got some EDID info, but there was no such thing as HSync Pulse Width for example. Or there may have been but under a different name and I didn't know what that was...
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archibael

Posts: 32


« Reply #25 on: April 05, 2007, 05:36:55 PM »

Quote from: "Naota"
Quote from: "archibael"
...


I see. Could you recommend me a fine EDID reader, from which I could find the needed values easily? I mean I got some EDID info, but there was no such thing as HSync Pulse Width for example. Or there may have been but under a different name and I didn't know what that was...


Use MonInfo, from EnTech.  It's phenomenal, and includes not only the parsed data but the original raw EDID stream as well.

The DTD information spat out by EDID and inserted into the Intel driver .INF file is in the following 18-byte hexadecimal format:

01 1D 80 18 71 1C 16 20 58 2C 25 00 10 44 42 00 00 9E

This starts in the 55th byte of the EDID stream, and there can be up to 2 more (starting at the 73rd and 91st bytes).  You can check to see if there are more by looking around the 73rd and 91st: if you see 00 00 00 F[something], it's not a new DTD, it's other data.

byte 1,2: hexidecimal pixel clock rate in 10kHz, reversed byte order
01 1D --> 1D01 = 74.25MHz

byte 3, 4, 5: Horizontal active and blanking.  Byte 3 is the bottom half of the resolution, byte 4 is the bottom half of the blanking, and byte 5 is the top of both.  
80 18 71  -->  780 horizontal rez (1920 decimal), 118 blanking (280 decimal)

byte 6,7,8: vertical active and blanking.  Byte 6 is the bottom half of the resolution, byte 7 is the bottom half of the blanking, and byte 8 is the top of both.  
1C 16 20 --> 21C vertical rez (540 decimal), 016 blanking (22 decimal)

Here's where is gets confusing... The lower part of the Hsync offset is stored in byte 9, the lower part of Hsync pulse width is in 10... and the upper part of each is stored in two bits of byte 12.  Luckily the upper part is usually zero.
byte 9, 10 ..12
58 2C .. 00 --> 058 Hsync offset (88 decimal), 02C Hsync pulse width (44 decimal)

To add more confusion, the bottom half of Vsync offset Vsync pulse width are stored together in byte 11, and the upper half of both is stored in the remaining bits of byte 12.  Again, the binary-impaired are fortunate in that usually this is zero and we don't have to convert hex to bin:
byte 11, 12
25 00  --> 02 vsync offset, 05 vsync pulse width

The rest you really shouldn't care too much about, except the final byte, byte 18.  Then you have to convert to binary, alas.  The secret decoder ring is:

bit 7 : 0 for progressive, 1 for interlaced
bits 6:5,0
{
000 = No Stereo
111 = Side By Side
110 = 4-Way Interleave
101 = 2-Way Left Image
011 = 4 Way Right Image
100 = Seq. Stereo, left sync
010 = Seq. Stereo, right sync
}
bits 4:3
{
11 = Digital Separate
10 = Digital Composite
01 = Bipolar Analog Composite
00 = Analog Composite
}
bit 2:
vertical polarity (0 for negative, 1 for positive)
bit 1:
horizontal polarity (0 for negative, 1 for positive)

So for this example EDID we have

9E = 10011110

Which is interlaced (bit 7=1), no stereo (bits 6:5,0=000), digital separate sync (bits 4:3=11), vsync+ (bit 2=1), hsync+(bit 1=1).

Note that in the Intel driver .INF file, a couple extra bytes are tagged onto the end.  They don't seem to do anything, so either leave them blank or keep them from the original values listed in the file.

So... if you want to reverse engineer a new DTD from information you have from a working Modeline, you can do so, and then stuff it into the Intel driver.  Easiest would be to just grab it from the EDID, as people soon discover, the EDID does not always work right off the bat and tweaking must ensue.  Plus, this enables you to do resolution-within-resolution.  It's painful, and no PowerStrip.  But it enables tweaking, for those with a monitor they really, really want to run at native rez and whose drivers are not cooperating on discovering this.

Edited to add pretty colors.  Hopefully they add clarity, as well.
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Naota

Posts: 4


« Reply #26 on: April 05, 2007, 10:21:54 PM »

Oh, I didn't expect such a detailed explanation. Thank you very much.

I've tried to convert the values from my internal laptop display. It's quite easy with your explanation. Again, thank you.

Again, an edit  Smiley :
If I manage to get a display working under a different PC with Powerstrip, is there a way to export those values? It would be much easier to use instantly the already working preferences rather than trying to find the correct ones.
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archibael

Posts: 32


« Reply #27 on: April 06, 2007, 01:00:56 PM »

Quote from: "Naota"
Oh, I didn't expect such a detailed explanation. Thank you very much.

I've tried to convert the values from my internal laptop display. It's quite easy with your explanation. Again, thank you.

Again, an edit  Smiley :
If I manage to get a display working under a different PC with Powerstrip, is there a way to export those values? It would be much easier to use instantly the already working preferences rather than trying to find the correct ones.


Yes!  I recommend using PowerStrip values from another video card, if possible!  Then plug them into the DTD format and you should be good to go.  You should only have to experiment the painful way if you don't have an alternative video card available to generate the initial settings needed.

Powerstrip can export as a Modeline, and in its own format as well, I think.
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Ashley Saldanha
Administrator
*****
Posts: 1806


« Reply #28 on: April 06, 2007, 03:04:37 PM »

I only tested this under XP on a i915G and i945G, but you should find the latest build of PowerStrip here supports user-defined, custom resolutions.

(Although this may be irrelevant in most cases, it is worth noting that PowerStrip, obviously, follows EnTech conventions, not Intel's.)
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archibael

Posts: 32


« Reply #29 on: April 06, 2007, 05:58:34 PM »

Quote from: "Ashley Saldanha"
I only tested this under XP on a i915G and i945G, but you should find the latest build of PowerStrip here supports user-defined, custom resolutions.

(Although this may be irrelevant in most cases, it is worth noting that PowerStrip, obviously, follows EnTech conventions, not Intel's.)


Interesting.  Is this a new capability?  According to Rik's post here (a couple weeks ago), custom settings were not supported on Intel drivers.
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